CHINESE BY ORIGIN. MOVED ACROSS ASIA. MADE IT IN CHINATOWN. NOW BRINGING THE JING EVERYWHERE.

ITS AS TRUE FOR THE MAN AS IT IS FOR THE BEVERAGE.

 
 

History dates the traditional ginger bao recipe back centuries—ok, millennia—to China. An old Chinese proverb says, “Man cannot live for more than 100 days without ginger.” Ginger bao is recommended with equal fervor by Kungkungs (grandmas) and Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) practitioners. Across most of Asia, some version of the drink is common, and it’s used to treat everything from digestion to impotence to the common cold. 

While the recipe is almost universal, so are the effects of modern life. Stress and action-packed days are the global norm. Nowadays, nobody has time to tend the kettle, and yet we need Ginbao more than ever. After Mr. Mak rediscovered the drink on his own health journey, we decided to bottle it for people everywhere. 

FROM HOMELAND TO CHINATOWN

Our story begins in Asia. Mr. Mak, Mrs. Mak, and their daughter Frances fled their homeland in the 1970s, surviving a series of refugee camps and harrowing escapes. They landed in New York City, penniless but grateful, living in a church basement and trying to figure out how to make it in America. They went to work, learning everything from English to the culinary arts. They took menial jobs. They saved and scraped by, and then eventually opened their own wholesale food business in Chinatown. Several decades of 16-hour days followed as they continued to build their American dream. 

REKINDLING THE GINBAO TRADITION

The work took a toll. Mr. Mak always exercised, practiced tai chi, and ate fresh foods, but stress was winning. Doctors prescribed medications. He cut down his workload. Still, he felt run down and was getting worse. Then he remembered an old family recipe for a ginger bao with ginseng. He put the Ginbao kettle on and soon he was feeling restored. His ailments eased, his energy returned. It wasn't long before the whole family was drinking Ginbao daily and feeling great. 

Mr. Mak, Mrs. Mak, and their daughter Frances in a refugee camp in Laos in the 1970s.

Mr. Mak, Mrs. Mak, and their daughter Frances in a refugee camp in Laos in the 1970s.


“This $#!% changed my life.”


 

FROM KETTLE TO BOTTLE

Friends and family saw the change in the Maks, and they wanted in. Pretty soon friends of friends were begging for batches of the beverage. Mr. Mak's Ginbao was replacing coffee and energy drinks. People served it to their kids instead of OJ or milk, and heated up a cup when they felt a cold coming on. Ginbao didn't taste like a health drink, but the healthy feeling was undeniable.

But Mr. Mak only had so many burners on his stove. 

So his daughter Frances and her friend (and fellow Ginbao enthusiast) Sandra Velasquez joined forces to help Mr. Mak bring the bao to people everywhere. We've worked tirelessly to perfect a recipe that maintains all of the benefits, integrity, and flavor of the original homemade Ginbao, and we proudly bring it to you. 

Free the chi!